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Over the winter I was shooting well composed but very boxy shots. I had been inspired by Rob Dobi to work on tightening up my composition and I think, to a degree, I was successful. I realized after a couple months that I was shooting everything with my 24-70 and my hotshoe level to keep all the framing straight. This was great for capturing the straight lines and repetitive patterns of the industrial sites I was shooting this winter, but it began to feel a bit stifling. I am incredibly glad I did it, because a lot of aspects of composition which I never had a handle on before are becoming second nature now. Whereas before I was struggling to use lines and placement in the frame, now compositions seem to pop out of the environment at me...they're almost unavoidable. I'm by no means the master that Rob is, but I learned a lot and have a basis upon which to build.


When I went to the Pines, before the Kings Park trip, I decided to force myself to use my 16-35 to try and open up my shots again. I also had another idea in mind which I wanted to try. Motts has been doing some really great off-angle shooting for a while, and I figured that I should give this a try. Kings Park was the first place I really started playing with types of shots. In some ways this shot is more reminiscent of my stuff from the winter than what I am trying to shoot now, but the overall feel of the photograph is what I was looking for.


When you're shooting psych hospitals there's always a desire to get into the heads of the people who were housed there. Shooting subjects with off-angles helps with this I think. There's a real danger of being trite and obvious there, but in looking through Motts' work I think as long as you're careful about how you do it and you do it for a reason the results can really be excellent. Shooting off angle doesn't release anyone from all the normal qualities which make a good photograph, in fact I think in some ways those qualities become more important as a method of grounding the picture after throwing the usual perspective completely out the window.


All right, enough pretentious artist BS. Let me know what you think.